Broken hearts, broken windows – #Love

I’m just back from Paris and I found a miracle there: a clean city and Parisians forcing themselves to be super nice. It was obvious they were making a huge effort to be nice and to speak English; and they did manage and I am even more impressed by their effort considering the stressful life they have. Thank you!!

What has happened? 

Is it because customers can rate the hotels, restaurants, taxis, museum or whatever on the internet? Is it the work of good people with great explanation skills? Whatever the reason it works, and we’re so glad about it.

Also, it made me think of New York City, who used to be a very hostile place in the 70s and the mayor, Rudolph Giuliani, managed to convinced New Yorker to have a cleaner city and be over-polite. And it worked! NYC is a much nicer city to live with. Being pleasant to the custumers raised the well-being of the workers… Food for thought, isn’t it?

It has been proven, love, smile and your muscles will not be stressed anymore. 

Even if you feel depressed, force a smile, force your good mood, it will send a signal to your brain that you feel better. That’s the way it works, it’s been proven. It is not I have an emotion thus my body reacts; it is my body reacts thus I have an emotion.

If a doctor analyses your brain (with electrodes), you can find a thought that will reduce your stress and improve your tension. This is a scientific fact. Have a look at the last 10 minutes of this lecture by Robert Sapolsky.

14. Limbic System – Robert Sapolsky: https://youtu.be/CAOnSbDSaOw

Read also the broken windows theory; it is absolutely fascinating how a city can reduce crime and anti-social behaviour: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broken_windows_theory

Steve Jobs’ 2005 Stanford Commencement Address

Drawing from some of the most pivotal points in his life, Steve Jobs, chief executive officer and co-founder of Apple Computer and of Pixar Animation Studios, urged graduates to pursue their dreams and see the opportunities in life’s setbacks – including death itself – at the university’s 114th Commencement on June 12, 2005.